Moody Penshaw Monument

March 13, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

New Photo added to the Landscape photo gallery, Penshaw Monument at its moodiest background. Image is available on and offline for purchase, simply buy from my 3rd party seller on here or message me for details about what sizes your after and i'll get back to you as quick as possible.

Moody Penshaw MonumentMoody Penshaw Monument

Penshaw Monument (officially The Earl of Durham's Monument) is a folly built in 1844 on Penshaw Hill, 136 metres above sea level, in Tyne and Wear, North East England, between the areas of Washington and Houghton-le-Spring in the city of Sunderland. It is dedicated to John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham and the first Governor of the Province of Canada, who was known locally as "Radical Jack" Lambton.

It was designed by John and Benjamin Green and built by Thomas Pratt of Sunderland, based on the Doric order. The Monument is the best preserved model of a Doric Hexastyle temple in Britain. Charles Vane, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry presented Penshaw Hill as a suitable site.

The foundation stone was laid by Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland (the Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England) on 28 August 1844.

The Doric tetrastyle monument is 30 metres (98 ft) long, 16 metres (52 ft) wide and 20 metres (66 ft) high. The columns are each 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) in diameter. It was designed by John and Benjamin Green and built by Thomas Pratt of Sunderland, based on the Doric order.

Resting on the columns is the entablature which itself can be split into three main parts. The architrave, the main spanning beam across the tops of the pillars. Above the architrave is the frieze, the central patterned section. Then the cornice is the upper part which projects outwards. Finally, the pediments are the triangular facings at each end of the Monument. One of the pillars contains a spiral staircase to a walkway around the top of the monument.

The Monument is made of gritstone from the Marquess of Londonderry's quarries on the east coast. Steel pins and brackets were used to hold the stone blocks in place.

In September 1939 John Lambton, 5th Earl of Durham gave Penshaw Monument to the National Trust.


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